Where Did The Saying And Bob’S Your Uncle Come From?

Where does the expression bought the farm come from?

Question: What is meant by the phrase “bought the farm”.

Answer: It comes from a 1950s-era Air Force term meaning “to crash” or “to be killed in action,” and refers to the desire of many wartime pilots to stop flying, return home, buy a farm, and live peaceably ever after..

Where did kick the bucket come from?

A person standing on a pail or bucket with their head in a slip noose would kick the bucket so as to commit suicide. The OED, however, says this is mainly speculative; The OED describes as more plausible the archaic use of “bucket” as a beam from which a pig is hung by its feet prior to being slaughtered.

What is the meaning of behind the eight ball?

A term, referring to the game of pool, meaning in an unfavorable or uncomfortable position: “After his unkind remarks were repeated to the boss, Gary really ended up behind the eight ball.”

How do you use Bob’s your uncle in a sentence?

Example SentencesYou add two cups of water to the mix, heat it for five minutes and Bob’s your uncle, the soup is ready.Just give it a good mix and apply it on the affected areas, and Bob’s your uncle, the pimple will vanish in 10 minutes.More items…

Why Bob’s your uncle meaning?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a phrase commonly used in Ireland, United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means “and there it is” or “and there you have it”. Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached.

Why do we say dressed to the nines?

“To the nines” is an English idiom meaning “to perfection” or “to the highest degree” or to dress “buoyantly and high class”. … In modern English usage, the phrase most commonly appears as “dressed to the nines” or “dressed up to the nines”.

What does Saved by the Bell mean?

The phrase ‘Saved By The Bell’ is used when one has been saved by the timely intervention of something or someone, or when one has been rescued from difficulty at the last second.

What is Fanny short for?

Fanny is a given name. A diminutive of the French name Frances meaning “free one”, and of the name “Estefany”, the Spanish version of Stephanie meaning “crown”.

What is the past tense word for buy?

The Difference between “Brought” and “Bought” Bought is the past tense and past participle of the verb to buy, which means “to obtain something by paying money for it.”

What is the meaning of No Dice?

No dice, from the 1920s, alludes to an unlucky throw in gambling; no go, alluding to lack of progress, dates from about 1820; and no soap dates from about 1920 and possibly alludes to the phrase it won’t wash, meaning “it won’t find acceptance.” Also see nothing doing; won’t wash.

Why do we say Bloody Nora?

Bloody Norah was originally called Norah and the maid for the wealthy Duke Wodingtonshire in the 17th century. … The expression came from the Duke himself as would tell the story of Norah to all he knew and would always refer to her as “Bloody Norah”.

What does Bob’s your uncle Fanny’s your aunt mean?

My Aunt Fanny! There would appear to be an inconsistency in the expression “Bob’s your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt” if the above two meanings are applied, the first phrase meaning everything is fine, settled; the second that it is unbelievable, untrue.

What does the word bought mean?

(Entry 1 of 2) past tense and past participle of buy.

What is cockney rhyming slang?

Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London . … For instance, “face” would be replaced by “boat,” because face rhymes with “boat race.” Similarly “feet” becomes “plates” (“plates of meat”), and “money” is “bread” (a very common usage, from “bread and honey”).

What does Fanny about mean?

(chiefly Britain, intransitive, idiomatic) To waste time or fool around; to engage in activity which produces little or no accomplishment. (chiefly Britain, transitive and intransitive, idiomatic) To wander about or prowl around.

Is had bought correct?

“Had bought” is probably more proper, but you will encounter it either way in real life.

What does my giddy aunt mean?

Giddy Aunts are the keepers of family stories and the tellers of wonderful tales, but what does the phrase “Oh My Giddy Aunt” mean? “Oh My Giddy Aunt!” was a popular English saying early last century, often used to indicate surprise in the days before less genteel expletives became more freely used.

What would best represent your mood if you say Bob’s your uncle?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a way of saying “you’re all set” or “you’ve got it made.” It’s a catch phrase dating back to 1887, when British Prime Minister Robert Cecil (a.k.a. Lord Salisbury) decided to appoint a certain Arthur Balfour to the prestigious and sensitive post of Chief Secretary for Ireland.

What does Burton mean?

English: habitational name from a place name that is very common in central and northern England. The derivation in most cases is from Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.

What does Bougie mean?

Urban Dictionary’s top entry for bougie defines it thus: “Aspiring to be a higher class than one is. Derived from bourgeois – meaning middle/upper class, traditionally despised by communists.” So in modern-day English, someone who is bougie is creating an air of wealth or upper class status — whether it’s true or not.

What is the meaning of until the cows come home?

Definition of till/until the cows come home informal. : for a very long time They’ll be arguing about this till the cows come home.

What does Bob’s your uncle mean in Australia?

‘Bob’s yer uncle’ meaning Meaning: if you do this (whatever is said first) it will work or be all right. Example: Example: Just add some extra water and Bob’s yer uncle.

Where did the saying gone for a Burton come from?

Gone for a Burton is a British English expression meaning to be missing or to die. The term was popularised by the RAF around the time of World War II. It migrated to the USA quickly and in June 1943 a story titled Husky Goes Down for a Burton appeared in Boys’ Life, the magazine of the Boy Scouts of America.

What does know the ropes mean?

Meaning. to know all the ways and means to get something done. to understand the nuances of how something should be done. the acquaintance of all possible means is said to know the ropes.

What is Kit and Kaboodle mean?

Everything entirely, the whole lotNoun. kit and caboodle. (US, Canada, Australia, idiomatic) Everything entirely, the whole lot.

Where does the expression I have a bone to pick with you come from?

: : “Bone to pick,” dates back to the 16th century, simply refers to a dog chewing endlessly on, and “picking clean,” a large bone. A “bone to pick” is thus a subject or issue that is expected to require considerable discussion or argument.